Writing update with a side of Friday funny

Happy Friday! Hope you had a great week and are looking forward to the weekend. I know I am. My plans are pretty simple: Go see Catching Fire and then write, write, write! I plan on hitting the 50,000 NaNo word count later today or early tomorrow (YAY!), but I still have half a book to go, so my journey isn’t over yet.

Plus, as the month of December approaches, I have a couple of other projects I need to temporarily shift my focus to. One is a short story for an open call submission for an anthology about ghosts. This will be a challenge since I’ve never written a ghost story, but what the hey, right? A bigger challenge will be my second project: Writing/creating two children’s books for my nephews. Each Christmas, I write them a story based on their life and then manipulate real photos of them in Photoshop to use as illustrations (here is the one I created for my nephew Dane last year). Writing children’s stories doesn’t come naturally for me, and with all the Photoshopping and book designing involved, they take me FOREVER. But, they’re worth it when I see the reaction from my family on Christmas morning. And, more importantly, the reaction I hope to see from my nephews someday when they’re older and can look back at the colorful series about their lives.

So, as you can see, even though NaNo is over for me, my weekends will continue to be mini writing marathons. But, I can’t complain. How can I? I LOVE writing!

Anyways, to send you off for your weekend, I thought I’d share one of my favorite How I Met Your Mother moments. It made me laugh this morning, so I thought it might make you laugh too.

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Have a great weekend!

Creating Kick-Ass Characters

Confession: I found today’s Twitter Treasure on Tuesday, but you know what? This diamond in the rough was just too bright and glittery to tuck away, especially with NaNo starting TOMORROW! So, if you’re having problems with developing your characters, or just want some last minute tips, check out this post on Chuck Wendig’s blog:

THE ZERO-F****** QUICK-CREATE GUIDE TO KICK-ASS CHARACTERS (AND ALL THE CRAZY PLOT STUFF THAT SURROUNDS ‘EM)

Characters are not a fast soup — they’re a long-bubbling broth developing flavors the longer you think about them and, more importantly, the more you write about them. (Which one assumes is the point of the inane questions asked by many character exercises, which would be a noble effort if those questions were not so frequently concerned with details and decisions that will never have anything to do with your character, your story, or your world.)

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Happy Halloween everyone! Stay safe, have fun and make sure to eat lots and lots of chocolate!

NaNoWriMo Tips – How To Deal With Deadlines

In all the years I’ve been writing, I’ve never taken on the mighty writing challenge of NaNoWriMo. But I have dealt with writing deadlines. Some of those deadlines have been enforced by other people (agents, producers, PR reps, etc.), while others have been self-enforced–or rather, self-inflicted. Case and point:

Last spring an agent requested my full manuscript. She ended up passing, but she liked it enough to recommended it to two other agents. So, I eagerly sent them my query letter. Less than ten minutes after I pushed the send button I realized I’d made a fatal mistake. It suddenly struck me that I didn’t like the first half of my book. In fact, I hated it. And I was petrified the two agents I’d just sent my query letters to would hate it as well. So–in a hyperventilating panic–I began chopping and revising my manuscript, all the while watching my inbox, certain one of those agents was going to ruin everything by requesting my now torn up material (such a major faux pas, I know, I know). Even so, I wrote and wrote and wrote. Faster and faster and faster…

Two months later, I had a completely updated book (100,000 words worth).

And zero requests. Zero!

Neither of those two agents ever contacted me. Go figure.

These disappointing and exhausting experiences of mine have taught me some important lessons about writing projects that are herded by deadlines. And I’d like to share some of those lessons with you. Hopefully they can help you during your tumultuous NaNoWriMo journey. (Or whatever deadline-driven trek you might be on.)

Chop out all distractions

imagesI know this sounds obvious, but it’s the most important part of the process. And it’s the hardest. Distractions are addicting (ahem, Candy Crush). Furthermore, most distractions are fun and bring us joy, so why would we want to chop them out of our lives? I don’t know how many times I’ve had to turn down going to the movies with a friend, or shopping with my sister, or visiting the Colorado Railroad Museum with my beloved nephews (trust me, if you saw their “WHOA!” expressions, you’d understand). And all because I needed to stay home and work on my manuscript instead.

And on that note…

Accept your loner status

alone-in-a-crowd.jpg.scaled.1000We’ve all heard writing is a lonely job. And it is. Even if you’re writing in a coffee shop, a library or a park, you’re separated from the rest of the world. It’s like an invisible barrier is erected between you and those around you, including your friends and family. The only people to keep you company are the characters in your head (and, let’s face it, those guys can get a little crazy sometimes ;-)). Personally, I think this is why a lot of writers get distracted so easily. We have an innate need to return to planet earth–to reconnect with our fellow humans–to remind ourselves we live here, and not in the fictitious other world we’ve created.

Unfortunately, when writing on a deadline, you don’t have the luxury of time to constantly re-root yourself in reality. If you want to make it to the finish line on time, then you gotta stick it out in that lonely other world with those real-but-not-real characters. And you must be able to cope with feeling disconnected, because you will.

My advice? During your darkest, loneliest moments, firmly remind yourself you’re not alone. Remind yourself that there are thousands of other writers cut off from the rest of humanity with you. I promise you won’t feel so alone anymore.

Commit at least ONE FULL day/week to writing

1197089396151240572hawk88_Calendar.svg.medNearly everyone in my life knows Saturday is “Don’t Talk to Jenna Day”. Saturdays are my think tank’s refueling station–the precious oil to my creative cogs. Saturday is THE day I write. From sun up to sun down I sit in front of my computer, writing and writing, until my eyes can’t stay open and my fingers start to cramp.

It’s intense, and it’s not always fun, but it’s vital to my production output. And not just because I get a ton done in one day, but because I get pumped up to do even more the following days. By dedicating a full day to writing, I find it a lot harder to turn off my imagination the rest of the week. No matter how tired I am, or how busy I get, I will find the energy and time to sit down and pour my thoughts onto paper. They’re just too warm and alive to coldly bury in my subconscious until the next weekend.

There’s no crying in writing

Okay, okay. There’s lots of crying in writing. And trust me, when you’re writing with a deadline in mind, you’ll probably cry even more. Mostly from exhaustion. And also the occasional–or not so occasional–bout of angry frustration. But you know what? You gotta suck it up and push through the emotional breakdowns. Just go grab a piece of chocolate, watch an episode of 30 Rock, and maybe listen to Journey’s, “Don’t Stop Believin'” a few times. Then get back to work. Go. Do. It. Now!

…Okay, that was my version of a tough love pep talk. Did it help? No? Whatever, go eat some more chocolate. GO!

Don’t be Miss Congeniality

misscongeniality-still8I don’t know about you, but I have a hard time saying no to people. Need a babysitter tonight? Sure, I’m there. Need a hundred cupcakes for that party next week? Of course, I’ll make them. Need someone to proof that business proposal? No problem, I’m happy to help. However, when it comes to writing on a deadline, I must stifle the urge to be Miss Congeniality and focus on doing what’s best for ME. I know, it sounds horrible. But when you’re on a deadline, you have to lace up the ol’ selfish boots and keep them on until the job is done. You have to constantly repeat to yourself, “Me. Me. Me…”, while telling others, “No, no, no…”.

Again, horrible, I know. But, unfortunately, necessary.

To lessen my guilt about this, I always give my acquaintances, friends and family a heads up: “I’m sorry, but I’m going to be crazy busy with writing the next month (or two), so I won’t be as accessible as usual. Sorry, sorry, sorry. See you on the flip side!”

Get it? Got it? Good!

Even when you’re not chugging, keep chugging

Concrete_sleeper_1638Okay, so maybe you can’t be a complete self-serving hermit during NaNoWriMo. There’s work, the gym, the kids, hundreds of errands, special events…No matter how hard you try to avoid or hide from life’s daily necessities, you can’t. The refrigerator isn’t going to restock itself. The bills aren’t going to be paid by the mythical money tree. The wedding of your best friend isn’t going to happen again (well, hopefully). But, don’t panic. It’s okay! You can keep chugging along on your project even when you’re not sitting at a computer or hovering over a notebook.

Example: Every day during my hour plus commute to and from work, I listen to a playlist I made for my book. As I listen to the inspiring songs I’ve collected, I strategize my next scene, or create a new character, or discover a plot hole. This way when I finally do get to a computer, I’m already primed and ready to translate everything I’ve “written” in the car.

Even so, I highly recommend keeping a small notepad on you at all times. That way if you come up with an idea and you’re terrified you’re going to forget it, you can quickly jot it down (because, as fun as scribbling on your hand or a paper napkin can be, chances are those won’t make it home–you know, because you accidentally wash your hands, or someone uses your inscribed napkin to wipe the pizza grease off their face!).

Just keep swimming…

This is the most important lesson of all: Just keep swimming. Just keep trying. Just keep writing! Swim, swim, swim. Try, try, try. Write, write, write!

Writing a book on a deadline is like running a marathon–exhausting, difficult and seemingly endless. But it will come to an end. Trust me. Just remember to keep your eye on the finish line and you’ll get there. Breathe. Focus. And push through the pain! You can do it!

Good luck everyone!

If you want to add me as a buddy on the NaNoWriMo website, you can find me under the name jenspenden.

Now, let’s get pumped!

Confession: I Judge Books By Their Covers

Guilty, guilty, guilty! I’m absolutely and undeniably one of those people who judges a book by its cover.

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Look, this is how I see it: if a cover doesn’t capture my attention, then what are the chances the story will? Boring cover must mean boring story line, right?

Yes, I fully admit this is a horrible attitude. But it’s the truth. I don’t have the patience to sit and read every synopsis. I need to know immediately whether a book is worth my time. I want bright colors that pop, gloomy colors that haunt, flashy fonts, intricate designs, breathless imagery…All of it plays a key role in my decision to purchase, check out, or even borrow a book.

And, whether you know it or not, those seemingly shallow things play a key role in your decision too.

One of my favorite college courses was Consumer Behavior Studies (Don’t roll your eyes or yawn. That class rocked!). It was fascinating to discover the intricacies of the human psyche and comprehend the various factors that people consider during their decision-making process. Well, guess what? Imagery is a HUGE factor! Colors. Artwork. Wording! Each tiny, but significant detail triggers emotions and memories and desires in our brains, driving us to reach out and pick up a product. In this case, a book.

Think of it this way: Books are like flowers. The prettier they are, the more likely they’ll be plucked.

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I own more books than I can count (11 shelves, one mantle, and plenty of floor space worth). And out of all those hundreds of books, over 85% of them were purchased because of their cover. The other 15% were chosen because of the author’s name/reputation, social media hype, or a reliable recommendation. So, clearly–at least for this particularly consumer–the cover is what sells a book. It’s not the title. It’s not the synopsis (I hardly even read those anymore). It’s all, all, all about that vital design and whether or not it grabs my attention.

Here is my book “plucking” process:

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  1. I scan a shelf/box/table, noting all colors and fonts. Nothing else matters at this point.
  2. A book JUMPS out at me. I eagerly pick it up and inspect it closer.
  3. The author. Yes, this is important to me. If I see an author that I’m not fan of, then I’ll forsake the eye-catching cover and move on. For example, after reading Gone Girl (don’t yell at me!) I know I’ll never buy another book by Gillian Flynn. It’s nothing personal whatsoever. I’m simply not a fan of her genre and style.
  4. Next on the inspection list: The title. To me, it’s better than a synopsis. A title gives me my first taste of the story. It teases, it taunts and, hopefully, it intrigues. If not, well…bye bye book.
  5. By this point, I’m usually sold. Yep, you heard me. Pretty cover? Check! Acceptable author name? Check! Good title? Check! However, if I still have doubts, I glance at the blurbs on the front/back.
  6. And if I’m still not sold after the blurbs–but the cover is just too cool to give up on it–then I swiftly skim the synopsis.
  7. At last, I make my final decision: get the book, or not? And, yes, as I debate, I stare at the cover! Gasp!

Believe it or not, this entire process takes me less than a minute. It’s quick, it’s dirty and it’s harsh. And, yeah, it’s unfair. But it’s reality.

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Now, is this a wonderful, winning strategy? No. Just like anything that’s judged by its outer beauty, a dazzling book cover doesn’t always mean a dazzling story. Ahem…

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And have I missed out on some great stories? Definitely. However, if I read every synopsis of every book on a shelf, I’d literally never leave the bookstore or library.

So that’s my confession today. I believe that if a book wants to be “plucked”, it better have a cover with a “come hither” look–of course, a wink and shimmy wouldn’t hurt either ;-). Otherwise, it’s bound to get lost amongst the papery masses.